THE TALLBOYS & THE REVELERS, LIVE AT THE ROYAL ROOM

This Friday, April 12th, we are thrilled to bring back local favorites The Tallboys (who also hold a Royal Room residency the second Sunday of each month) alongside Louisiana super group The Revelers for a night of Cajun and country music! See what Tallboy Charmaine Slaven (rhythm guitar, vocals, flatfooting, square dance calling) has to say about both bands:


(The Tallboys live at the Redmond, WA performing arts center)

RR: Can you tell us a bit about the band – how The Tallboys come to be, and what the group is up to currently?

CS: The Tallboys started up as more of a bluegrass band in 2003.  The original members – Charlie Beck (banjo), John Hurd (bass), Paul McGowen (mandolin), & Rob Adesso (guitar) – would play bluegrass tunes and songs together for fun, and some of Charlie’s original material.  They soon found Joe Fulton playing fiddle at the Pike Place Market and added him to the band.  After a few months of playing bluegrass-type material, they discovered the Foghorn Stringband (http://foghornstringband.com/) out of Portland, OR – a group of young guys playing old-time tunes, which have a distinctly different feel to bluegrass.  The Tallboys delved into the old-time material, researching old fiddlers from the 20′s and earlier, discovering a community of local old-time music in the process.  In 2005, they invited myself, Charmaine Slaven, to perform as a clog dancer.  I also took on promotions, and helped with booking.  As the band grew busier, Rob Adesso quit to focus on his day job, and Paul McGowen moved back to his home state of Arkansas.  I started playing guitar. Later, in 2010, Joe Fulton moved to the midwest, and could only have part time involvement with the band, so we recruited WB Reid to fill in on fiddle.  Joe is now moving back to Seattle, and we’re excited to have both WB and Joe on the fiddling.  WB is also a talented mandolin players, so will switch from time to time.  We also recently started a Honky-Tonk version of our band, as we’ve all become more and more interested in learning old country songs, so we are now occasionally performing with Charlie on lap steel, WB on electric guitar, John on electric bass, myself on rhythm guitar, Joe on fiddle, and Cahalen Morrison on drums.

Besides concerts, The Tallboys play in a lot of more lively/social settings like square dances. Why are get-togethers such a big part of what The Tallboys do?

We like to think of performances as a chance for everyone to get involved.  I personally remember when I moved to Seattle from Montana, I was very surprised that there was so little dancing at shows. People seemed uncomfortable with anyone even dancing near them, everyone was so serious, and the music was so loud that nobody could even have a conversation.  I think it made it difficult as a new person to Seattle to meet people.

I think that for a music community to really thrive, everyone needs to be an active part of the process, so involving the crowd as dancers is a tried and true way of inclusivity! Square dancing & social dancing very successfully overcome some of these hurdles. When dancing is actively encouraged, people find themselves moving just because somebody gave them permission to – it’s amazing to see all the smiles when folks get out on the floor.  We also try to foster a socially active climate at our dances, meaning that the music is at a volume level where folks can still have a conversation and get to know one another. Also we often say on the mic to please ask others to dance and fill up the dance floor.  I think it really makes it fun for everyone, and we get a lot more out of the performance watching our listeners physically enjoy the music!

You’ll be sharing the stage with Louisiana band The Revelers. Have you played with them before? What are they all about?  

The Revelers are actually a new project, but we’ve been friends with many of the band members when they were in the Red Stick Ramblers.  They visited the PNW a few years ago as guests at the Festival of American Fiddletunes and there they talked me into coming to visit them down in LaFayette for the Black Pot Festival which they founded and organize every year.  They are amazing musicians, and true bearers of the cajun music tradition, a vein of American music that was almost lost due to the lack of young folks learning the music about a decade ago.  Thanks to the efforts of the Balfa Brothers and many others, the music is once again thriving, and we’re so pleased that these guys enjoy visiting the NW and bringing their wonderful music and culture with them.  They live in a true dance culture, where folks just aren’t shy about dancing at all, and the band really plays with such a groove, it’s impossible to sit still!

The Tallboys Country Band & The Revelers will play at the Royal Room on Friday, April 12th,at 8:30 PM. No cover – donations suggested & appreciated. 

PIANO STARTS HERE: A NIGHT OF HERBIES

Herbie Hancock in his studio.

This Wednesday, Seattle-based pianist Tim Kennedy returns to the Royal Room as curator/host for the March installment of Piano Starts Here, our bi-monthly series highlighting the work of influential pianists/composers, with A Night of Herbies - showcasing the music of Herbie Nichols and Herbie Hancock with performances by Marc Seales, Dawn Clement, Tim Kennedy and Gus Carns. We caught up briefly with Tim about the series and this month’s performance. We hope to see you there!

RR: How does the Piano Starts Here series work?

TK: Four or Five pianists learn the music of a composer who plays jazz piano and each pianist plays two or three songs per set. We don’t sweat it if people do the same song because it’s cool to hear different people’s interpretations. We have also had lectures about the featured composer in the past. The series suits the Royal Room because it is very much about new interpretations of historically important music.

The series usually features the music of just one pianist – why two this time? Where does the music of Herbie Nichols/Herbie Hancock intersect?

So far we’ve always featured the music of one pianist/composer. In the past we have a done Monk, Duke, Sun Ra, and Bill Evans. We’re doing two this time, mainly because they share they same first name. Their writing is very different, yet both share the spirit of jazz, and harmonically we can see that both of them were trying to push the boundaries. It will be an interesting mix. Herbie Nichols recorded maybe 4-5 records total in the 50′s while Herbie Hancock, who himself started recording at an early age and continues to today, was still a teen.

Herbie Nichols at the piano.

Herbie Nichols is almost as obscure as Herbie Hancock is famous – why do you think Herbie Nichols is such an underground favorite among jazz musicians like John Zorn and Han Bennink, etc?

I think John Zorn etc. can relate to Herbie Nichols because he had a really individual sound and style and was trying to push the music and make new sounds. I think Herbie Hancock did the same, probably even more, but Herbie Hancock has been in the mainstream and you can hear his influence on everyone, while the same is not true for Herbie Nichols.

What’s your relationship to their music? 

I have always enjoyed both pianists – Herbie Hancock at an early age made his mark because I was a big break-dancer and his hit Future Shock was my jam. I then got more into the jazz as I explored more Herbie Hancock, and didn’t hear Herbie Nichols until college when I was looking for new sounds. I was excited to find some in his records.


(Herbie Hancock and the Rockit Band perform Future Shock, Tim’s formative break-dance jam, live in 1984)

“A Night of Herbies” starts at 8 PM this Wednesday, March 27th. Tickets are $7 advance/ $10 at the door. 

 

WAYNE HORVITZ & JACOB ZIMMERMAN TALK LENNIE TRISTANO

(Lennie Tristano plays Tangerine in Copenhagen in 1965)

In anticipation of tomorrow night’s “Lennie’s Pennies (March 19 2013) performance, a birthday tribute to the great composer, pianist and theoretician Lennie Tristano, the Royal Room’s Wayne Horvitz chats with Seattle based alto saxophonist/composer Jacob Zimmerman about Lennie Tristano’s contributions to jazz music and education:

WH: How did you first hear about the music of Lennie Tristano?

JZ: A combination of fate and unavoidability – I was definitely aware of Lennie by the time I was in high school, though I didn’t really like his music at first. Then when I was in college at New England Conservatory this piano player asked me to play Lennie’s music in a band with him. I remember thinking to myself – “I don’t really like this music, but everybody talks about it so I should probably play it!” I did end up playing in that band, but the real tipping point was a little later, in my lessons with piano player Anthony Coleman, a self-professed non jazz musician, who said to me one day, “if you want to read about an artist who is truly self-aware, who can really articulate himself, you have to read Conversations with the Improviser’s Art – which is written by Lee Konitz, who first came to public attention as one of Lennie Tristano’s most important artistic partners.

I read that book after I graduated, and it made me want to get into playing jazz standards again – something I had grown up doing but had stopped when I got involved with more experimental music in college.  The way Lee Konitz talked about playing standards in that book made sense to me – that you actually could play standards and play something completely new each time. Once I got finished with grad school, that became all I wanted to do. It was 2010 when I really got serious about playing the Tristano approach to standards on my own.

I first heard about Tristano from Anthony Braxton. It’s really interesting to me that the people who seem most interested in avant-garde music are also the ones most interested in Tristano, as opposed to a lot of straight ahead players who are more interested in learning Charlie Parker or Coltrane or Lee Morgan solos. When I moved to NYC and met John Zorn – someone who like me doesn’t consider himself a “jazz musician”, but loves jazz and is interested in jazz – he was the one who said “let’s look at some of this Tristano music”. Do you have any idea why that is?

I honestly don’t know – but I suspect it has a lot to do with that common misunderstanding with Lennie’s music which is that it’s very cerebral and cold which, to be honest, is what I thought the first time I heard it when I was 15 because it wasn’t like anything else I had heard before.

What do you think was his influence? Whether he proclaimed them or not?

 In my opinion the biggest thing he did was not just to come up with the idea, but to actually come up with a way, that jazz improvisation could be taught – a whole educational approach.

So it’s all his fault!

Yeah – he was one of the first people to say: you can take lessons in jazz; learning on the bandstand isn’t the only way. It’s amazing to see how the teaching practices he developed over 60 years ago are still completely relevant and useful today, things I use all the time and that were also the basis for classes that I took at NEC without my knowing it. But a lot has happened in jazz education between Tristano and today that has really messed it up.

 

Like what? What are some of the things that Tristano introduced to Jazz education, and what are some of the things that came along later, that you think got in the way?

One of the great things Tristano had all his students do was have them sing along with recordings of great jazz soloists and use their ears and voices to replicate. A lot of jazz theory that developed between then and now puts emphasis on being more analytical and theoretical in the way you think about what you play. For Tristano, the emphasis was on getting close to recordings of solos that you knew were great and developing a feeling for how it felt for those soloists to have played like that – not just taking information and replicating it, but really getting close. It’s a little abstract, but also not, because if you internalize those things, you feel the difference. Let’s face it – when you’re improvising, nobody can intellectually think about every single note they play. No matter what, there is a level of intuition that you’re going on.

And patterns that exist – whether you think you’re playing patterns or not.

Exactly. They come out in a way that you’re not completely conscious of in a micro level. When you learn to trust your ear, that’s when you’re really able to improvise and come up with something new each time.

That’s right. I’m always telling my students: look at a Mozart sonata and look at a Charlie Parker solo – ninety percent of the same stuff is going on. So – you’re talking about Tristano teaching through singing, and yet a lot of his music does sound sort of “cerebral” as you say – why do you think it sounds that way? Is it the “cool” aspect of it?

 Part of the aesthetic in the music with Lennie and those guys was that you did not want to “emote”, in fact the word emotion was not a good word with Lennie, he preferred “feeling”, everything was a feeling. The way I understand it – take Bach for example – most of the time I listen to Bach, I don’t hear something specific emotionally. The way Bach’s music sounds is not based on a saxophone player who’s trying to sound like he’s in agony or has the blues. Instead the emphasis is shifted to letting the succession of notes, the lines, the melodies they are playing, create feelings by themselves without musicians putting as much emphasis on the more “expressive” musical gestures.

So in some ways it’s not so surprising that its not the most popular jazz style ever invented.

At the same time, Jerome Gray – a really interesting teacher here in town – told me that one year in the late 50s or early 60s Oscar Peterson won the Downbeat Poll in the piano, and the next year Tristano did. It’s interesting to note that in at least a certain era Tristano really had the attention of the jazz community – but that’s a pretty deep contrast. I mean obviously Oscar Peterson was an incredible pianist, but also a crowd pleaser in a certain kind of way.

In the concert at the Royal Room you’ll be presenting pieces Lennie wrote, some that protégés of Lennie’s wrote, and also a couple of standards that he just liked to do.

Yeah, one of the standards we’re going to play is “Tangerine” which I chose because Lennie played it on his great recording of a solo concert in Copenhagen. In it he does this great thing where he walks a bass line with his left hand. I fell in love with that tune through that recording, it’s a pretty classic one. We’re also playing “It’s You or No One” which Warne Marsh used open sets with all the time, as a tribute to Lennie.

Lennie’s Pennie’s will take place at the Royal Room this Tuesday, March 18th at 8:00pm and will include performances by Jacob Zimmerman (alto sax), Steve Treseler (tenor sax), Wayne Horvitz (piano), Carmen Rothwell (bass), and Greg Campbell (drums). Tickets are $7 advance/ $10 at the door.

FRANCES McCUE ON RICK BASS AND STELLARONDO: LIVE AT THE ROYAL ROOM

Award winning writer and environmental activist Rick Bass has been called a  “chronicler of western wilderness”. This Thursday, Bass and Missoula based band Stellarondo will reveal their latest form of collaborative storytelling to Seattle audiences in  “An Evening of Songs and Scored Stories”. We talked with local poet Frances McCue, who helped to organize the event, about what to expect:

How would you characterize Rick Bass’s work?

Rick Bass has written loads of books, both fiction and nonfiction. I admire his writing about place— he makes resonant connections to whatever patch of earth he is writing about. What I love is how he gets you to reconsider not only your relationship to place, that crusty old idea, but how he gets you thinking about finding a place that suits your temperament and your own advocacies in the world. Move to where you need to be. That’s what Bass did. He was from Texas and now he lives in the Yaak Valley of Northwestern Montana. He was arrested two weeks ago in front of the White House [for] protesting the Keystone Pipeline, slated to bring oil from Canada’s dreaded Tar Sands to refineries in Texas. Because Bass once worked as a petroleum geologist, he knows the world of big oil and flipped his career into writing. Good for him.

What do you know about Bass’s collaboration with Stellarondo, which merges writing and storytelling with live music and performance?

Stellarondo describes their music, combined with Bass’ writing, as “a bass, and a pedal steel guitar can give us both the high winds, falling branches and crowning trees of a wildfire and the scream of the chainsaw cutting a way through it.” Not too much crazy shit like chainsaw squeals, but surely enough sinister, red dirt ruts to ride through, with a weird breeze at your back.  Love it.

In interviews Rick Bass often emphasizes the importance of being engaged with the world as crucial to sustaining a meaningful writing practice and life. I liked thinking about that in terms of these performances, which bring storytelling to venues like the Royal Room, where people are also known to dance and drink and get loud. You helped to organize this event – why did it make sense to present it at the Royal Room instead of a literary venue?

The Royal Room is a pleasure production space where imagination about music includes a “drop on in and hang” vibe that other podium-led venues don’t. Gotta be at the Royal Room. The music is key here; Bass is a sparkly ornament that hangs off it. You gotta love that! Writers are so hermetic that typically, when they go out they have to be the whole act. Not here. Music. I’m totally psyched.

 

Rick Bass and Stellarondo will perform live at the Royal Room this Thursday, March 7th, at 8PM, as part of their CD release tour.